For Purpose Law Group Blog

First, there was Nonprofits: What Not To Do (July 13, 2021).  Then, two months later came Nonprofits: More “What Not to Do” (September 7, 2021). This premise is loosely based on a hugely popular BBC reality show about twenty years ago called What Not to Wear. Each episode featured the ambush of an ordinary woman with no fashion sense. Confronted with examples from her own tragic wardrobe, she was clueless: “What’s wrong with this…
It was “just days after a Baltimore [federal] court dropped a bombshell on the nation’s private and independent school community” that “a California federal court joined the fray….” According to the education law experts at Fisher & Phillips LLP, these two late-July rulings, flying well below almost everyone’s radar, could turn out to be a big deal. So what happened? In a nutshell, District Judge Richard Bennett of the District of Maryland ruled on…
As the summer of 2021 opened, there were broad hopes of the pandemic coming under control and the American workplace returning to at least some sense of normal. None of that unfolded as expected. One of the particular oddities was “The Great Resignation.” As jobs came back, the workers did not. The National Council of Nonprofits was following this trend with increasing concern.  In The Scope and Impact of Workforce Shortages (An Updated…
For over a year, we’ve reported on the unprecedented phenomenon of money falling out of the sky and landing on the nation’s nonprofits. These downpours of dollars have come from several distinct “cloudbursts”: Federal: The key source has been the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds program under the American Rescue Plan Act (March 2021). It’s a whopping $350-billion for the states and local governments to either: use for themselves for certain approved purposes…
“Now more than ever, it is critical to understand the ever-evolving trends shaping philanthropy and the nonprofit sector.” The Giving USA Foundation just released Giving USA 2022: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2021, the most current edition of the nation’s “longest running, most comprehensive report on philanthropy.” It’s a massive, 350+ page package, researched and written by the experts at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. The report authors…
Through the pandemic, amid the darkest days, there were periodic rays of sunshine. The government came through – early and often – with surprisingly generous assistance. But along with the much-needed and greatly appreciated cash and tax benefits came the familiar baggage: a thick new layer of bureaucracy, a dizzying maze of complex eligibility rules and procedures, and a boatload of strange new acronyms. And the rules kept changing. “With half a dozen federal COVID…
It was just over a year ago when Anthony Klotz sat for an interview with a reporter from Bloomberg Businessweek. The labor market was showing unusual volatility; in the month of April 2021, over four million Americans had quit their jobs, marking a 20-year high. The Texas A&M associate professor of management had some thoughts about it. “The great resignation is coming,” he said.        No Mere Blip     Real-time data soon confirmed Professor…
In the usual government budget proceedings, officials and legislators perform the thankless task of divvying up far less revenue than needed. These sessions can fairly be characterized as snooze fests of reviewing minutiae interrupted by periodic flare-ups of partisan temper tantrums. The rare budget surplus, though, produces a different dynamic. For the second year in a row, for fiscal year 2022-23 beginning July 1st, California will have more money than predicted. The official estimate released…
It’s still raining money from the government. That’s the urgent message from the National Council of Nonprofits to the 501(c)(3)s around the United States in the just-issued third edition (April 2022) of its Strengthening State and Local Economies in Partnership with Nonprofits. The fiscal skies opened up over a year ago in March 2021. Part of the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) was the $350-billion allocated to the Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund…
“Will 2022 be the year that philanthropy finally has a serious conversation about charitable naming rights?” Naming Rights In The New Year (February 2, 2022). Apparently, yes: judging by the drip-drip-drip of headlines in recent months about court battles and public protests, almost obscene bidding wars, and intrusive and outrageous demands by billionaire donors. It’s long overdue, according to philanthropy historian Benjamin Soskis last fall in A Legacy of Sackler: Let’s Reconsider Philanthropic Naming Rights