Worms & Germs Blog

Promoting Safe Pet Ownership

Latest from Worms & Germs Blog

Ivermectin is a commonly used anti-parasitic in animals, and it’s also used in people for some parasitic diseases. Additionally, it’s still widely discussed in some internet circles for treatment or prevention of COVID-19. That’s based on some in vitro study, poor quality ‘clinical trials’ and mainly anecdotes. It’s led to stories of people hoarding or using animal ivermectin products for their own use. I’ve had lots of questions from the general public and vets (and…
I’ve had a blog writing dry spell lately (too much other stuff to catch up on), so I’ll jump back with a quick summary of some recent papers on SARS-CoV-2 in animals. There isn’t really anything surprising here, but it’s a continuation of what we’ve been learning and saying for a while. SARS-CoV-2 infection in cats and dogs on affected mink farms, the Netherlands We have various concerns related to SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks on mink farms.…
We’ve once again updated the Guide to Mitigating the Risk of Infection in Veterinary Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic (14-Apr-2021).  It can also be accessed through the Ontario Veterinary Medical Association Coronavirus FAQ webpage (member login required). I’ll be happy when we can stop updating these guidelines. Progress is good and adding new information is useful. I just long for the day when we don’t need them. Previous versions of the guidance and other…
Here’s an updated version of A Guide to Mitigating the Risk of Infection in Veterinary Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Also available through the Ontario Veterinary Medical Association website. I’ll be happy when we can stop updating these guidelines. Progress is good and adding new information is useful. I just long for the day when we don’t need them.…
I’ve taken a look back at some posts from the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, to see how my thoughts have evolved, what I got right and what I screwed up. We have a lot of COVID-19 posts (starting from when we called it “novel coronavirus” or “Wuhan coronavirus” before the SARS-CoV-2 terminology existed). Here are some highlights and “grading” of my comments from a selection of posts January 20, 2020 “New coronavirus: Companion
As spring approaches, a pressing question has come to the minds of many kids…. “Can the Easter bunny get COVID?” or “Can Easter bunny eggs spread COVID?” The good answer is no. Easter bunnies are safe from this virus and kids don’t have to worry about whatever the Easter bunny leaves behind. Regular rabbits aren’t very susceptible to this virus. They can be infected experimentally (no one’s going to try that with the Easter bunny)…
I tweeted recently about a report of the B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 variant in a dog and cat in the US, and figured it deserves some more discussion. A new pre-print (non-peer reviewed paper) will probably raise more concerns so I figured I better get around to writing about it. Recently, researchers in Texas identified a dog and cat with the B.1.1.7 (UK) variant. This variant is becoming widespread internationally and fueling third waves of…
The companion animal Ontario Animal Health Network has produced a series of mini-podcasts on COVID-19 precautions in veterinary clinics, featuring none other than Dr. Scott Weese.  Each mini-podcast features a quick 3-5 minute “lighting round” on common questions and topics – bite-sized bits for busy practitioners and clinic staff who may only have a few minutes to spare these days.  Current topics include: Avoid the 3 Cs: Crowding, close contact, confined spaces Rethinking clinic…