WSNYC Blog: The Latest in Employment Law

Latest from WSNYC Blog: The Latest in Employment Law

Employers in New Jersey can now mandate that employees receive the COVID-19 vaccine before returning to the workplace, with some exceptions. The state provided this new information in a “recent guidance that lays out a legal road map for businesses that want to adopt a mandatory vaccination policy,” according to a Law360 article. Exemptions from vaccination are required only for employees who are unable to receive the vaccine due to religious reasons, a disability, or…
Ever since the Tokyo 2020 Olympics were moved to 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic, athletes and fans alike have eagerly awaited the start of the competition. However, LGBT workers in Japan are calling for a new law to be enacted before the Olympic Games commence this summer. Activists say that this LGBT equality law needs to be passed so that Japan, as the Olympic host country, will comply with the Olympic Charter, which…
Last month marks a year since the Covid-19 pandemic fully emerged in the United States. Throughout the course of the last year, significant change has taken place at the state, national, and global levels in efforts to combat the extremity of the virus. As a result, progress has occurred in many sectors, including the transition of schools and jobs to virtual platforms, the implementation of social distancing guidelines and rigid cleaning requirements in businesses, and…
Last week, the New York legislature reached a deal that, if approved, will legalize recreational marijuana use for adults 21 years of age and older. According to a New York Times article, this deal is “paving the way for a potential $4.2 billion industry that could create tens of thousands of jobs and become one of the largest markets in the country.” The bill could be passed as soon as this week. The deal allows…
Last month, Bonnie Jacobson, a waitress at Red Hook Tavernin Brooklyn, New York, was fired for refusing to take the Covid-19 vaccine. In an interview with NBC News, Jacobson shared her hesitations in receiving the vaccine, including inadequate research about “the vaccine, fertility, and pregnancy.” She also stated she was not permanently against getting the vaccine but rather, preferred to wait for more conclusive research on the vaccine’s effects on fertility. According to an…
The Senate recently passed a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package brought forth by Democrats. The bill passed 50-49 after an overnight voting session and will now head to the House for final passage. Democrats say this bill is part of their “America Rescue Plan” and will help get Americans and the economy back on track. Many Republicans have criticized the bill, saying it is much more expensive than necessary. They have also pointed to previous…
On January 22, 2021, the New York Mets quietly dismissed their hitting performance coordinator, Ryan Ellis, due to sexual harassment allegations. Ellis’s dismissal followed the firing of Jared Porter, the general manager of the Mets, on January 19th because Porter admitted to sending inappropriate text messages to a reporter while working for the Cubs, as well as overall inappropriate behavior. The Mets sexual harassment saga continued when Mickey Calloway, the former manager of the…
Earlier this week, New York’s attorney general filed a lawsuit against the world’s largest online retailer, Amazon Inc., for mishandling worker safety during the Covid-19 pandemic. This lawsuit is not the first time Amazon has faced criticism for not providing a safe working environment for its employees. In 2020, workers filed several complaints against the company, including a petition signed by 600 employees  that urged the online retailer giant to improve working conditions. Attorney…
Instacart has terminated ten employees working at a grocery store in Illinois who voted to form the first and only union for the grocery delivery company in early 2020. The workers unionized with The United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 1546. The news of their termination was “buried” in a blog post the company published in January about introducing new curbside pickup models. The blog also informed readers about further layoffs of in-store shoppers.…
  PricewaterhouseCoopers, a large accounting firm, reached a nearly $12 million settlement deal last month over age discrimination allegations. The lawsuit began when Steven Rabin, who was 50 years old, claimed he was wrongly denied a job because of his age. In March 2019, a federal judge conditionally certified a collective action of roughly 5,000 other individuals who also allegedly experienced age discrimination. After this certification, the parties began settlement negotiations and eventually reached…